Posts Tagged ‘Basic income’

Welfare.

June 2, 2016

By replacing graduated income tax with a flat tax, the affordable citizens income is almost doubled. Is a Basic or Citizens Income affordable?, February 2016.

Work should be allocated by self-selection not compulsion, but beneficiaries should have a reasonable financial incentive to do paid work. Benefit withdrawal is effectively a tax, and effective marginal tax rates, including benefit withdrawal, should ideally be no higher for beneficiaries than for high income earners. “Full employment”, in Alison’s manifesto.

Women should have their own money as individuals, not just as part of a family or household, and children need at least as much money as adults, if the cost of childcare, including the opportunity cost of parental childcare, is taken into account. Welfare reform for the 21st century, August 2010.

High priority was given to the need for tax and income support for women working in the home, and for more childcare facilities. The most logical way of doing this, with the least fuss, is by the basic income method. History of Basic Income politics in New Zealand, 1996.

The 1601 Poor Law in England provided for each parish to raise a rate for the relief of poverty within its own jurisdiction. In the early 19th century poor relief in the south of England was income-tested in some parishes but not in others. Some welfare history.

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European election.

June 10, 2014

For me, in all the thousands of words I saw about the European election campaign, one sentence stood out. It was in the Manchester Friends of the Earth’s list of 10 policies:

” a new EU economic strategy . . . which shifts the tax burden from labour to resource consumption . . . ”
( http://www.manchesterfoe.org.uk/eu-election-survey-response-peter-cranie-green-party/ ).

Environmental taxes on resources and pollution could be better than income taxes, not only for the environment, but also for reducing inequality.

( ” Progressive tax and inequality”, in “Citizens incomes and progressive tax”,
https://ammpol.wordpress.com/ubiprog ).

I think this policy should be a major feature in the 2015 Westminster election campaign.